Cornwall Orchid Society

Do you have a love of ORCHIDS
Whether you have one orchid on a windowsill or a collection, have you ever thought I would like to know how to get my orchid/orchids to grow better & flower again.
Have you ever thought where do I get the ‘tried and tested’ information on how to achieve this.
We have a society, a wonderful group of people who love their orchids and are happy to share their knowledge.
We have talks, hold plant clinics, have repotting sessions and like to organise orchid related
outings.
Our meetings are monthly and we welcome anyone who would like to meet and
socialise with
like minded people and love all things ORCHID.

Come grow with us

Become a member

Join us today




NEWS PAGE



Malvern International Show, is the biggest orchid show in the uk with 41 exhibitors from around the world. It is part if the Three Counties Show? Tickets are available at £8.00 per day (Normal gate price is £23.00) They are available to society members family and friends.
Nobody knows what impact (dare I mention the word) BREXIT will have on the orchid trade. The Europeans are already telling Chris that they think this may be their last show. Please let me know by mid April if you would like tickets. I already have 3 names. Just send a message on Facebook or let me know at our meeting. Email Margaret (click on the link)



NEWSLETTER JUNE 2018

Hi All
What a meeting we had this month, Malcolm Perry as always gave us a wonderful talk, this time on Coelogynes, and has asked already if we want him again next year, we of course have said yes, and have booked him for June 2019.
He also bought along a wonderful selection of interesting and unusual orchids for us to purchase, I have to admit I indulged greatly but really pleased with my new additions to my ever growing collection.

A big warm welcome to our four new members who have now joined our Society, and we look forward to seeing them again next month when we have Trey Sanders coming to give us a talk… subject still yet to be agreed, but I am sure it will be interesting whatever it may be, and I will let everyone know asap.
Another chance to spend pennies on something a little different, Trey is moving back to Australia, and I believe we are the second to last or even the last talk he will be giving. Well I hope you are all watering your Coelogynes as if it were a monsoon !

Nikki Secretary of the Cornwall Orchid Society




Some photos from our yearly show on Sunday 29th April 2018





Margaret

Dendrobium

Esther Mason



Margaret

Best Species at the show

Margaret Lemon

Robert wins best in show at Devon today (05/05/2018)









Cornwall Orchid Society polo shirts and fleeces available from Cornwall Screen Print & embroidery St Austell. Tel 01726 68689
Polo shirts £15.50 plus vat Fleeces. £22.99 plus vat
£1.00 extra each item for extra large

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Orchid Care

Information kindly provided by Burnham Nurseries

www.orchids.uk.com

Orchids on Bark or in a Basket


Many of the tropical species grown in cultivation grow as epiphytes in their natural habitat of the rain forest. This means that they grow up on the branches of the trees where they can benefit from the light, air movement and humidity. We can grow many of these on pieces of cork bark or in baskets, hanging in the greenhouse or conservatory so they can grow in conditions more like their natural environment. Please note that it is not recommended that orchids are grown on bark in the home as they will dry out too often in the less humid atmosphere. Vandas and related genera are often grown in open wooden or plastic baskets with no compost. These too must be grown in a very humid environment to prevent dehydration.

FLOWERING: Many different species of orchids can be grown in this way and will bloom at various times of year when their season comes around. Types with pendent flower spikes grow well hanging in baskets.

TEMPERATURE
: Cool species need a minimum of 10°C (50°F) in winter, intermediate a minimum 12°C (55°F) in winter and warm minimum 15°C (60°F) The daytime maximum should be 20-27°C (70-85°F).

LIGHT: Keep all orchids growing on bark in dappled light, shaded from the brightest summer sun. Vanda types need good light to help with their re-flowering.

WATERING: Plants growing in this way need regular watering by spraying, this needs to be done daily during the warmest parts of the year, or even dunk in a bucket for 10 minutes if they are drying out quickly. Add fertiliser to the water during the growing period.

Brassia Orchid Care


The brassias are commonly known as the ‘Spider Orchids’ due to their spindly flowers. They are very attractive when in bloom with graceful arching spikes of many showy flowers. They come in various shades of green with variable darker markings on the petals and lip. Also the flowers are sweetly scented and they are mostly spring or summer flowering. The plants have dark green leaves and oval pseudobulbs with a compact habit.

RE-FLOWERING: The blooms come from the side of the newly matured pseudobulb. They need fairly good light to help regular blooming which is generally annual in the spring or early summer months.

TEMPERATURE: Intermediate with a minimum 12°C (55°F) in winter, daytime maximum of 30°C (85°F). Will grow best in a humid greenhouse but some will grow well in the home.

LIGHT: To help with re-flowering keep all Brassia types in good light all year round, shaded from the bright summer sun but good light in winter.

WATERING: They like to be moist all the year round as many tend to grow in the in the winter months. They also make copious aerial roots so these will enjoy regular spraying. They are grown in open bark compost and like to be hanging up in a basket or a hanging pot. Re-pot when the plant has outgrown its pot or basket, they don’t mind being a little over the side of the pot, when the new growth is young in the late summer.

Cattleya Orchid Care


The Cattleyas have been bred with many different families such as Laelia and Guarianthe to make many complex hybrids including Laeliocattleya and Cattlianthe. They tend to have large, showy flowers in bright colours with some miniature varieties too. The species are not so common and come from Brazil and other South American countries. They have upright pseudobulbs with thick, leathery leaves.

RE-FLOWERING: The blooms come from inside a sheath produced at the top of the newest mature pseudobulb, at the base of the leaf. They can be singular or several on a head. And are annual flowering usually in spring or autumn.

TEMPERATURE: Intermediate with a minimum 12°C (55°F) in winter, daytime maximum of 30°C (85°F). Will grow best in a humid greenhouse but some will grow well in the home.

LIGHT: To help with re-flowering keep all Cattleya types in good light all year round, shaded from the bright summer sun but good light in winter.

WATERING: They do not like to be too wet so are grown in an open bark compost to ensure good drainage. When in growth in the summer water regularly and spray too, especially aerial roots. In winter, rest with only occasional watering and spraying on sunny days. Re-pot when the plant has outgrown its pot, they don’t mind being a little over the side of the pot, when the new growth is young in the spring or summer.

Coelogyne ochracea


This is a popular spring flowering species from India that has a beautiful sweet fragrance as well as very pretty white and yellow flowers.

TEMPERATURE: As it is a high altitude plant from the Himalayas, it requires a cool drop in temperature at night in the winter especially. The minimum temperature should be around 8-10°C in winter. Try to keep as cool as possible in the summer.

LIGHT: Keep shaded from the bright summer sun but give as much light as possible during the dull winter months.

WATERING: From the time the new growth begins around February this orchid requires regular watering and misting of the leaves. The flowers are produced first and when they are over the leaves with continue to grow from around the base of the flower stem so do not cut this off. Water and feed once a week all through the summer growing season (imagine the monsoons!) and then in the autumn the new bulbs will have filled out. Continue to water the plant until this state has been reached and all the bulbs are plump then reduce the watering right down for the winter. Occasionally mist the plant over the winter and give a little water if the bulbs start to shrivel.

Paphiopedilum


One of the most exotic orchid groups are the ‘Slipper Orchids’ These unusual flowers have a slipper-shaped lip at the front of the flower which, in nature, help the flower become pollinated. In their native countries they are terrestrial, living in the ground or maybe on rocks. They do not have bulbs like other orchids but instead produce shoots that form into a clump. The flowers come from the centre of the newest mature shoot. Paphiopedilums come from the Far East and some have attractive mottled foliage.

RE-FLOWERING: When your slipper orchid has flowered cut the stem right off and the plant will start to grow a new shoot. When this is mature it will produce the next bloom. Some have single flowers; others are multi-flowering.

TEMPERATURE: Most Slipper orchids are warm growing requiring a minimum temperature of 15°C (60°F), with a daytime maximum of 30°C (85°F). Some plain leafed paphiopedilums need a cooler minimum 10°C (50°F).

LIGHT: Keep well shaded from bright, direct summer sun as this can scorch the leaves. Give as much light as possible during the dull winter months.

WATERING: Keep the free-draining bark compost moist all the year round. When watering the plant, remove it from any cover pot or saucer, pour water through the pot and then let it drain before placing it back in a decorative planter. Never let the pot stand in water. Allow the compost to dry out slightly and the pot to become lighter before watering again. Avoid watering collecting in the crown of the plant as this can cause a rot. Add a little orchid fertiliser to the water once every 2 or 3 waterings (approx. every 10-14 days) all year round.

Phragmipedium


One of the most exotic orchid groups are the ‘Slipper Orchids’ These unusual flowers have a slipper-shaped lip at the front of the flower which, in nature, help the flower become pollinated. The genus Phragmipedium come from South America and in their native countries they are terrestrial, living in the ground, often near to running water. They do not have bulbs like other orchids but instead produce shoots that form into a clump. The flowers come from the centre of the newest mature shoot.

RE-FLOWERING: When your Slipper orchid has flowered cut the stem right off and the plant will start to grow a new shoot. When this is mature it will produce the next bloom. The phragmipediums are sequential flowering, having many flowers one after the other over several weeks.

TEMPERATURE: These Slipper orchids are warm growing requiring a minimum temperature of 15°C (60°F), with a daytime maximum of 30°C (85°F).

LIGHT: Keep well shaded from bright, direct summer sun as this can scorch the leaves. Give as much light as possible during the dull winter months.

WATERING: These orchids are usually potted in rockwool which means that they keep damp more easily than in bark. This is more suited to their way of growing as they like to be kept moist at all times. When watering the plant, remove it from any cover pot or saucer, pour water through the pot and then let it drain before placing it back in a decorative planter. Never let the pot stand in water. Allow the rockwool to dry out only very slightly before watering again. Avoid watering collecting in the crown of the plant as this can cause a rot. Add a little orchid fertiliser to the water once every 2 or 3 waterings (approx. every 10-14 days) all year round. When repotting, always damp the rockwool before use and use gloves to handle it.

Phalaenopsis


One of the most popular orchids grown as houseplants are the Moth Orchids or Phalaenopsis. They make good indoor plants because they can tolerate the drier heat of central heating as well as having extremely long-lasting flowers at any time of year. They do not have bulbs like other orchids but instead grow fleshy leaves, which store food and water with new ones forming from the central crown. They also produce a lot of aerial roots that come over the side of the pot as well as into the bark compost.

TEMPERATURE: Moth Orchids love the warmth of most modern homes, keep a minimum on winter nights of 18°C (65°F), with a daytime maximum of 30°C (85°F).

LIGHT: Keep shaded from bright, direct summer sun as this can scorch the leaves. Give as much light as possible during the dull winter months.

WATERING: Keep the free-draining bark compost moist all the year round. When watering the plant, remove it from any decorative pot or saucer, pour water through the pot and then let it drain before placing it back in a decorative planter. Never let the pot stand in water. Allow the compost to dry out and the pot to become lighter before watering again. Avoid watering collecting in the crown of the plant as this can cause a rot. Add a little orchid fertiliser to the water as directed. Spray the aerial roots regularly with water, trim when they have died off. A Phalaenopsis with many aerial roots is a healthy, happy plant.

Cymbidium


The Cymbidium orchids are ever popular, their showy flowers lasting many weeks. They are best grown in a cool conservatory and placed out of doors in the summer. They are mostly winter and spring flowering although there are also summer and autumn varieties too. Standard varieties grow into large plants with large flowers and bulbs. Miniature or compact types will stay more manageable. A plant should be re-potted in the spring after flowering when it has outgrown its pot, about every 2-3 years.

RE-FLOWERING: Keep these orchids cool and light in winter and outdoors in summer to help re-flowering. Keeping them too warm can prevent blooming.

TEMPERATURE: Cymbidiums need a minimum of 8°C (45°F) in winter to give them a sufficient change in conditions from the warmer summer, when a maximum of 30°C (85°F) is adequate.

LIGHT: Keep shaded form bright, direct summer sun as this can scorch the leaves. Give as much light as possible during the dull winter months.

WATERING: Keep the free-draining bark compost moist with more frequent watering in the spring and summer, the main growing season. When watering the plant, remove it from any cover pot or saucer, pour water through the pot and then let it drain before placing it back in a decorative planter. Never let the pot stand in water. Allow the compost to dry out slightly and the pot to become lighter before watering again. Add a little orchid ‘grow’ fertiliser to the water once every 2 or 3 waterings (approx. every 10-14 days) from February to August and ‘bloom’ fertiliser from August to November.

Vanda


Vanda hybrids are traditionally bred and grown in the Far East for cut flower as the blooms have a good, long-lasting quality. They are commonly grown hanging up by a small plastic or wooden basket with their long, aerial roots exposed to the air and moisture around them. In their native countries it is always very humid with regular rainfall so they keep moist all the time. To grown them in cultivation needs a little more work. Ideally a warm and humid orchid house is the best as this is the nearest to what they need. As these orchids are becoming more widely grown, more people want to grow them in the house. This can be a challenge as the indoor environment can be too dry for them, so there are 3 main ways to grow these orchids:
1. Hanging with their roots exposed and sprayed heavily with water daily in summer, every 2-3 days in winter.
2. Placed in a glass vase with a little water in the base and sprayed regularly. This helps to keep a humid environment around the roots.
3. Potted in loose bark chippings with the majority of the aerial roots in the bark to help keep them moist and prevent dehydration. This is perhaps the best way to grow in the home but spraying and watering is still required 2-3 times a week in summer.

LIGHT: Vandas need good light to enable them to flower well so keep in a bright position in winter to give maximum available light and in a shadier position in summer to prevent scorching from the direct sun.

FEEDING: Add the feed to the water that you spray onto the leaves and roots and pour through the pot if potted in bark. Dilute as directed.

FLOWERING: After flowering trim the dead stem off and continue to grow as above, with correct culture the plant should bloom again within 12 months.

Below are photos from our display at Burnham Orchid Festival









Meetings

2017/18 Programme

Our informative and friendly meetings are held at 2:00 pm on the first Sunday of every month at the Village Hall in Chacewater, near Truro. TR4 8PZ.  There will be a chance at the beginning of every meeting for members and guests to chat over a cup of tea or coffee, to stage orchids in the table show or to admire those exhibited by other members. New members and guests are always welcome. The admission charge is dependant on what speaker is in attendance at the time.

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Date

Venue

4th March John Sirkett will be giving a talk on disa orchids.
1st April Final arrangements for our show
5th-7th April RHS London Orchid Show (and plant fair) at St James Park
29th April Annual Show. All day at Chacewater Village Hall
6th May NO MEETING
3rd June Talk by Malcolm Perry on Coelogyne Orchids
15th-17th June International Orchid Show, Three Counties Show Ground, Malvern
1st July A talk with Trey Sanders
5th August Plant Sales and Garden Party at Tresawsen
7th October A talk by Ian Parsons (Ondontoglossums)
2nd September A talk on Wild Orchids by Carolyn Viner
4th November Plant Clinic. Plus 'Competition time' Bring your zygopetalum seedlings with you for judging.
2nd-4th November British Orchid Congress and British Orchid Show at Writhlington School, Knobsbury Lane, Writhlington, Radstock BA3 3NQ
2nd December Christmas Party

Thomas Lobb (1817-1894)


Courtesy Wikipedia

Click on the coloured links for more information

Thomas Lobb

was a British botanist and, along with his older brother, William Lobb, collected plants for the plant nursery Veitch.
Lobb worked in India, Indonesia and the Philippines. In 1845 he discovered the first orchid species of the genus Phalaenopsis growing in the eastern Himalayas, at an altitude of ~1,500 m (4,900 ft). The plant, Phalaenopsis lobbii, is named in his honour.


Early Life

He was born and raised in Perranarworthal and Egloshayle, near Wadebridge where his father John worked as an estate carpenter at Pencarrow and gamekeeper at Carclew estate, for Sir Charles Lemon. Both brothers, despite varying accounts (neither wrote an autobiography), worked in the stovehouse.  Thomas moved to join the Veitch family at Killerton in 1830, aged 13. The Veitch Nurseries moved to Exeter in 1832 and Thomas suggested his brother William as the nursery's first plant hunter in 1840.

Plant Collecting

Thomas' first collecting trip, inspired by the success of his brother William Lobb, was from 1843 to 1847, collecting in Java as well as visiting rainforests in Singapore, Penang and Malaysia.
After a rest period working back at the Veitch Nurseries and after seeing William again for the first time since 1840, a second collecting trip took place from 25 December 1848 to 1853. This visited India, Sarawak, Philippines and Burma, India and Nepal. During this visit he briefly met up with Sir Joseph Hooker who was on a collecting expedition in the Khasi Hills.

More Collecting

His brother William returned to America in 1854, finished working for Veitch in 1860 and died in San Francisco in 1864.

Thomas Lobb returned to Java in 1854 to 1857, his third collecting trip.

Injury

A leg injury occurred on his fourth and final collecting trip (1858 to 1860) visiting North Borneo, Burma, Sumatra and the Philippines. He retired to Cornwall in 1860 to live near family, having injured a leg, which was eventually amputated either in the Philippines or Cornwall.

Thomas Lobb appears to have parted company with the Veitch nursery in 1860, possibly over compensation for his leg injury and amputation suffered collecting plants in the Philippines in 1860 (according to the Veitch Nursery history, Hortus Veitchii).


Secluded Retirement

A later argument over a possible return to collecting in 1869 contributed to the death by heart attack of James Veitch junior.

After this, Thomas Lobb remained in quiet secluded retirement in Stanley Villa, Devoran, Cornwall, busy with gardening and painting, whilst living off his money from his herbarium collections and letting several cottages he had built.

He died in 1894 and is buried in Devoran churchyard, Cornwall where a small memorial garden and headstone can be found to himself and his brother William.

Become a Member.

Become a member of our Society

We are a friendly society and we hold meetings on the first Sunday of each month at Chacewater Village Hall.



We have knowledgeable growers giving advice and talks on Orchid care along with Plant Clinics and re-potting sessions we also have specialist speakers and social get-togethers throughout the year. We have a table show at our meetings where our members show their Orchids. There are free refreshments (tea, coffee and biscuits) We also hold an annual show.



Our fees are as follows:
£20.00 Single.
£30.00 Couple.
16 and under Free.

 

 



Nicholla Ingram: Secretary
Email Nikki (click on the link)
Mobile: 07561161461

Margaret Lemon: Treasurer
Email Margaret (click on the link)
Mobile: 07929248156

 

 

 

 

This is our Blog Page



Cornwall Orchid Society First Show

Some Photos from the event.

Cornwall Orchid Society display, showing best species member and best in show by Margaret Lemon

Margaret Lemon's Orchids

Best species member and best in show by Margaret Lemon

Great attendance